Books, Thoughts

Bookmark Monday (V): The Good China Bookmarks

Frequently while I was growing up, I was told that gifts or things that were given to me were meant to last & ‘wouldn’t it be nice if you were able to give this to your children one day?’  Going through my bookmark box, I found a few of those bookmarks that qualified.  Ones that I jokingly think of to save for company, like the good china.

Continue reading “Bookmark Monday (V): The Good China Bookmarks”

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Books, Thoughts

Off the Shelf: Ariosto

AriostoAriosto by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

3.5 instead of 3. Equal parts historical fiction & epic fantasy, Ariosto follows the poet Lodovico Ariosto near the end of his life in Renaissance Italy. Entangled in the deadly politics of the Firenzen court, Ariosto’s perspective is split between the frustrations of his patron Damiano de Medici & the poet’s latest epic about the Nuovo Mundo. Each world is threatened by great conflicting forces & Ariosto strives to live & write despite the pending chaos of each.

Yarbro’s book is one that clicked with me at just the right time. I had just finished rereading Dante’s Commedia so I was prepared for the court intrigue & the flowery style of writing found in the book. I also had a better appreciation for the conflicts of Church & State in Ariosto with Dante’s vision lingering on the edges of my reading as well. With that said, Yarbro’s historical research is evident in the dense world-building that takes up the first third of the novel & it took me some time to get through the material.

But even with the period details slowing me down, the novel truly shines in certain places. First, I loved seeing what another nation would have thought of the New World outside of the typical Anglo Protestant take I’d been taught in school. (Bonus points for figuring out the Italianized versions of Native American tribes like Cérocchi, Pau Attan, and Cica Omini.) Secondly, despite the obvious clues used to outline the courtly intrigue, Yarbro excels at keeping the readers guessing at how much Ariosto understands & how involved he may or may not become over the course of the book. He even tries to convince Damiano that help can come from the New World because his own desperation drives the poet to believe in his own characters.

Ultimately, Ariosto is about an artist living in a fractured, deeply paranoid society & with the current political state of my own country, I found myself moved to tears by an ending that would not have held such poignancy previously. I want to recommend it to anyone willing to give historical fantastical fiction a chance but with Ariosto hitting so many specific associations for me, I’m not sure it would be as powerful for others. If this review interests you though, I hope you’ll give it a try.

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Off the Shelf: Sex Criminals, vol #1

Sex Criminals, Vol. 1: One Weird TrickSex Criminals, Vol. 1: One Weird Trick by Matt Fraction

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Meet Suzie & Jon, two perfectly ordinary people who freeze time when they have sex & rob banks to save their failing local library. Wait, what?

No, seriously–she’s a fun, literate girl who works at the library & is trying to keep it from closing. He’s a curious, quick-witted guy who hates working at the bank that’s foreclosing on Suzie’s branch. They meet at a party, find out that they are crazy-compatible & bizarro hijinks ensue. Reader beware, if you are not into sexually explicit stuff, you won’t make it past the first few pages–not because of any terrible depictions, but because the frank, intelligent approaches to sexuality in this series are not going to go away.

With that said, Suzie & Jon are people with flaws, jobs, dysfunctions, & weird senses of humor like the rest of us. This volume follows their budding relationship & fills in their backstories, giving us a good idea of who we’re hanging out with here. There were lots of satisfying story moments that had me rooting for these two: their first meeting where they bond over Lolita, Suzie’s epic rock-out in a pool hall to Queen’s Fat Bottomed Girls, even their texts to one another are charming. While the main premise of the series hinges on the wonderful & weird sex, there’s an equal focus on relationships & how amazing it feels to click with someone.

I also love how Zdarsky draws faces, how each is distinctly memorable but somehow relatable, as if I could meet people like them in everyday life. The background visuals are fun to linger over & are especially key in a world where people can walk through a time-frozen reality. Expressive, yet still silly, Sex Criminals is an offbeat series with a lot of heart.

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Off the Shelf: Shadow and Bone

Shadow and Bone (The Grisha, #1)Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

3.5 instead of 4. Alina Starkov is a plain apprentice scribe in the tsar’s armies until an attack by dark creatures forces her to used magical talent she’s denied herself in order to save her own life & the life of her childhood friend Mal. Noticed by the Grisha, a class of trained conjurers, & their leader the Darkling, Alina is taken to their compound to learn how to hone her skills as a weapon to dispel shadowy forces unleashed generations ago. Alina struggles to remain true to herself amid the intrigue of court & the machinations of the Grisha.

I was fascinated by the world Bardugo has created. Vaguely medieval & ambiguously Christian, Alina’s Ravka reminded me of C.J. Cherryh’s Rusalka, as if her story could take place at a later time in that universe. Her perspective, though, is sort of straight-forward: girl-as-apex-of-love-triangle-tries-to-find-herself plot, making the characters around Alina more interesting in their familiar-but-reconfigured positions. I was obsessed with Genya, seemingly a court pet but soon revealed as a woman who is canny enough to maneuver her way through treacherous political waters. She’s an excellent contrast to Alina, whose torn desires between her love Mal & her lust the Darkling wear thin. Although the reclaiming of her powers is an interesting substitute for sex in this YA tale.

Bardugo also captures fascinating snippet of real Russian history to create Ravka–like the semi-Rasputin-like figure to the odd spartan routines observed amid the Grisha’s extravagance to the orphanage set up by a local duke. Overall, I’m kind of meh on the main story but the rest of the details are lovely, which is enough to keep me reading.

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Off the Shelf: Bee and PuppyCat, vol. #1

Bee and Puppycat, Vol. 1Bee and Puppycat, Vol. 1 by Natasha Allegri

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

A collection of stories written by Natasha Allegri & others following Bee & PuppyCat’s adventures as well as exploring their colorful world. Honestly, I love the Bee & PuppyCat series–weird, mysterious, silly & charming; I was sucked in from the first surreal short when it appeared on YouTube. But the episodes themselves are frequently open-ended & leave watchers wanting more, which can work in a creator’s favor–only to a point. This collection, unfortunately, is more of the same. Could we please have a little more story with the pretty pretty art?

The story by Allegri herself is another assignment that takes Bee & PuppyCat to Snowglobe Planet, undertaken so Bee can get back in her apartment after locking herself out. It’s a lovely little one-shot & the use of the QR codes are cool, but is this just another set-up for an unresolved plot? The rest of the stories are interstitial & cover everything from Bee’s inability to “adult” properly to game time with Deckard to actually putting off dealing with interesting consequences from one of the YouTube episodes. The varying art styles are fun & certainly recall the flood of fanart surrounding this series. But I’d hate for these characters to just be these cute objects without any real substance. Could I get some resolution please? Or is this series just a magnet of whimsy where everything is utterly precious forever?

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