Books, Thoughts

Bookmark Monday (III): Bookmark Buying PSA

The holidays are here, everyone!  There will be lots of cool gifts out there for stocking stuffers or even just as small gifts from friends & loved ones.  Bookmarks are a fantastic example.  But as I was going through my bookmark box, I noticed a few at the bottom that, though lovely & given with good wishes, I have never used.

Three fashionable but impractical bookmarks
Bookmarks that tear the page instead of keep the place

All three of these have top pieces that are heavier that the rest of the bookmark, meaning they tend to sink down onto pages & tear them.  Especially if you are mainly a paperback reader, like me.  They are lovely to display as objects on shelves or clipped to card stock or stuck upright in a plant or basket.  But remaining in a book, even for a brief while?  Nooooooo.

However, if you do like the weight & durability of a metal or plastic bookmark, you can still find interesting ones that are in the classic rectangular shape without any edges or corners that could catch.  For example:

A stylish metal bookmark with a classic form & durability
A simple, elegant solution

Ahhhh, a wonderful straightforward marker that I can put in my book without any worry about what it will do to my pages.  So remember, this holiday season, go with a timeless style of bookmark so your bibliophile friends will worry less about their pages & remember more your thoughtfulness.

 

 

(Bookmark Mondays originated from Guiltless Reading.)

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Books, Thoughts

Nostalgia Porn of the 90s, part 2

Maybe I noticed this because I think that everyone else lives in their memories of the 90s, like me.  But I came across this book cover & I get the nagging feeling that the cover artist watched a lot of The Pretender.  Because this certainly looks like Ryan Merriman, who played Young Jared.  Or some scary VR replica.  Brrr, the uncanny valley is unforgiving.

Coincidence?

Books, Thoughts

Off the Shelf: Native Tongue

Native TongueNative Tongue by Suzette Haden Elgin

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A dystopia where women are legally inferior to men & the formally educated are useful scapegoats that advance Earth’s territory as interpretors & bargainers. Native Tongue follows the various women of “The Lines” as they attempt to navigate a society that devalues them but still relies heavily on their fertility & their usefulness as housekeepers.

Originally published in the 80s, this book is definitely a sci-fi classic worth revisiting. Not only is the world-building captivating, many of the class & gender fears Haden Elgin outlines are still worryingly real. While the story is not as severe as something like The Handmaid’s Tale, there are plenty of unexpected dark & sad moments. For example, something as innocuous as a crush becomes a lesson in verbal humiliation & degradation. Definitely worth picking up if you come across it.

P.S.: This is totally associative, but the last scene of the book reminds me of the chorus to Matthew Good’s “Fated.

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Books, Thoughts

Off the Shelf: The Disaster Artist

The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever MadeThe Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made by Greg Sestero

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A coauthored memoir/tell-all about The Room & Sestero’s friendship w. Tommy Wiseau.

Look, Sunset Blvd is one of my favorite movies & I’ve absorbed other media like Party Down & You Must Remember This so I know that Hollywood is full of weird, ambitious people. But Disaster Artist seems to unwittingly showcase just how self-absorbed someone can become after working in “the business.” The story alternates between Sestero’s acting pursuits & his changing relationship with Wiseau as well as the actual filming of The Room.

The authors seem to want to have it both ways: readers get all the bizzaro anecdotes about shooting one of cinema’s worst movies & hears how oddly sympathetic Wiseau’s personal story is. This approach creates a tension where the radar cannot put the book down but will feel like a creepy voyeur. It is not a fun read. I feel like I’ve been privy to a public confession from someone who just wanted some company any way they could get it.

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Books, Thoughts

Off the Shelf: Angel Catbird, vol. 1

Angel Catbird, Volume 1Angel Catbird, Volume 1 by Margaret Atwood

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

Is it a man? Is is a cat? Is it a bird? It’s Angel Catbird!

Ok, it’s a little retro; it’s kind of cheesy; there are so. many. puns! But I kind of enjoyed just seeing Atwood play with the format & the comic ties into the Canadian conservation efforts so … I’ll give this one a pass. Do whatever you want, MA.

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